Social
X
Organic Search SEO

Four reasons you can’t ignore SEO

Thursday, August 14th, 2014 by James Lee

Sometimes SEO gets a bad name, as if optimising websites is a dark art form. Those who practise it can be found dancing under the full moon chanting algorithmic updates, it may seem. That kind of SEO is not for me. After all it’s rather difficult to read Google’s Webmaster Guidelines by moonlight.

SEO is still a highly effective marketing activity. Here are four reasons to still take it seriously.

1) Everyone (well, nearly everyone) is doing SEO

Man in a smart suit doing SEO SEO-ers are not just the people peering over their specs watching videos of Matt Cutts (Google’s Head of Webspam). Everyone is doing SEO. The question is: “Are you doing it effectively?”

If you haven’t written bespoke page titles for your website, Google will display what it likes. You can build a website and it will be found, but will it be found enough, by the right people?

That’s why good websites, the ones that are the most visible, have someone looking after them, optimising them and ensuring they are technically sound.

2) SEO throws out marketing spiel

Marketing manager in a suit bored of marketing spiel In the BBC’s Dragon’s Den series, optimistic entrepreneurs pitch their budding business to a feisty bunch of self-made millionaires. It goes like this:

Entrepreneur: “Our product is like a new sunrise in the marketplace. It is a beam of light penetrating the darkness.”

Dragon Investor: “How many have you sold?”

Entrepreneur: “We are feeling a material connection with our target market. A real togetherness and partnership…”

Dragon Investor: “Give me figures!”

Entrepreneur: “Well, let me just say, there’s a real feeling of kinesis among our demographic…”

Dragon Investor: “How. Many. Have. You. Sold?”

Entrepreneur: “Three.” SEO brings real, tangible data. With SEO we can say to clients, “Look, your website is more visible to more people.” Then show them a graph to prove it. The results are measurable.

3) I don’t burn SEO on my bonfires

Somewhere, a company is spending a pretty penny to create funky leaflets that are shoved through my front door. They produce the leaflet ideas, design its snazzy graphics and then they pay someone to deliver it. It ends up on my bonfires – a wonderfully cheap alternative to firelighters.

Once this type of marketing activity is done it is done. The money and time placed into it only garners the short moment I glance at it on the way to work. In contrast, SEO is long term. By investing the same time and money into optimising your website you can reap those benefits for years to come. As an example, one of our clients has an article on how to get a job in their industry.

It took a few hours to write but continues to bring in visitors to the website month after month.

4) I can’t find my socks but I can use Google

Bloke in a smart suit using Google. Ask me to find nearly anything in my house and I’d struggle. Ask me to find anything on Google and I bet I can. Google is great at showing people what they are looking for, but it’s SEO that helps Google decide to show you to those people instead of your competitor.

People search “car servicing in Portsmouth”, because they want their car serviced. The site that has been optimised and looked after by an SEO professional has a better chance of being found than one that is slow, short on content and not that relevant to the searcher’s intent.

SEO-ers of the world, unite

Optimising your website makes the world a better place. Ok, it doesn’t make us Mother Teresa, but it does help give people what they want while helping businesses grow.

We do SEO and we are rather proud of it.

Drinking coffee on a wood table.

Share this article

About the author

James Lee

James Lee

James is a SEO Campaign Delivery Manager. He works to maximise a websites visibility in search and loves working with customers to achieve their goals. Get James talking about how to optimise a website's page titles and you will be there for hours. He doesn't always talk about himself in third person.